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Virginia F. Borges, MD, MMSc

Virginia F. Borges, MD, MMSc

Deputy Head, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado

Director, Breast Cancer Research Program and Young Women’s Breast Cancer Translational Research Program, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado

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A 46-year-old woman had a routine screening mammogram that showed new calcifications in the posterior left breast. A diagnostic mammogram showed several small punctate calcifications, and a 6-month interval follow-up was recommended.

We review available strategies for screening and risk reduction through chemoprevention or risk-reducing surgery, as well as challenges for management of breast cancer in patients with prior exposure to radiation for Hodgkin lymphoma.

An asymptomatic 45-year-old woman presented for a screening mammogram and was noted to have a soft-tissue opacity with calcifications in the left breast. Ultrasound revealed a highly suspicious mass.

A 24-year-old woman presents to her primary care provider with a mass in her left breast. Examination confirms a 2.2-cm mass in the upper outer quadrant, with a single mobile axillary node that is firm to palpation.

Postpartum breast cancer represents a high-risk, under-recognized subset of young women’s breast cancer. The lack of clear identity for postpartum breast cancer is due in part to both the “dual effect” that pregnancy has on the incidence of breast cancer diagnosis.

The patient presented to her primary care physician 3 months prior with an inverted left nipple and a palpable lump that was highly suggestive of neoplasm on mammogram. An ultrasound-guided core biopsy revealed an infiltrating solid-type ductal carcinoma in situ. The estimated size of the mass was approximately 1 cm. She had no symptoms suggestive of metastatic disease.

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