Topics:

Latest Issue

ONCOLOGY Vol 29 No 3

A 69-year-old man presented in the urology clinic for evaluation of bilateral renal masses, discovered incidentally during routine exams for follow-up of his chronic kidney disease.

The next few years hold great promise, as new agents emerge and others consolidate their place on our shelves. We will be forced to rethink strategies and redefine management as a new era of immuno-oncology dawns.

Here we review monoclonal antibodies that have received FDA approval for the treatment of NHL and CLL in the last 5 years, as well as promising agents in development.

The best management of distress in a lung cancer patient involves aggressive physical symptom control, attention to concerns about death, and psychosocial support for the patient and his or her caregivers, as well as management of more typical psychiatric symptoms.

The identification and characterization of gene signatures, driver events, and pharmacogenomics in molecularly homogeneous subsets of patients is likely to advance effective drug development strategies in colorectal cancer.

Although genomic testing can improve the cost-effectiveness of a treatment, assessing the cost-effectiveness of genomic testing outside the context of its impact on treatment is not practical.

Numerous genomic tests are available for use in colorectal cancer, with a widely variable evidence base for their effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we highlight many of these tests, with a focus on their proposed role, the evidence base to support that role, and the associated costs and risks.

Smaller early-stage tumors may lend themselves to less radical lung parenchymal sparing resections or no surgery at all.

This review looks at the current data and guidelines for thoracoscopic resection of stage I NSCLC and discusses the potential for limited lung resection in patients with the disease.

A state of equipoise now exists for various surgical options in the treatment of early lung cancer, underscoring the need for shared decision making.

 

By clicking Accept, you agree to become a member of the UBM Medica Community.