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Palliative and Supportive Care

Palliative Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Bone Metastases Improves Quality of Life

Palliative radiotherapy is an effective means of alleviating pain and improving overall quality of life in elderly patients with bone metastases, according to a new study.

Palliative and Supportive Care

Cancer patients on palliative care wards were more likely to experience a dignified death than patients in other parts of cancer centers, a recent study found.

This review will focus largely on the effects of systemic cytotoxic treatment on cognitive function, reflecting what has been most extensively studied in the literature.

Much of the existing research into the phenomenon commonly referred to as “chemobrain” has been descriptive, and we know enough now to identify some patients at risk for cognitive changes after a diagnosis of cancer.

With the growing number of cancer survivors, there is increased interest in understanding and preventing post-treatment sequelae that may limit full recovery to prediagnosis health.

Cognitive dysfunction during and following treatment for cancer, often referred to as “chemobrain,” is an adverse effect of cancer treatment that may interfere with patients’ ability to resume their precancer lifestyle, with subsequently reduced quality of life.

Results of a new study indicate that half of patients with multiple myeloma were referred to specialist palliative care.

Integrating palliative care earlier in the disease process can improve quality of life and possibly survival for patients with advanced cancer but its value is widely misunderstood, according to a recent review by palliative care experts.

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