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Survivorship

Survivorship

Collaboration between oncologists and reproductive endocrinologists/infertility specialists not only will improve patient care, but it also will facilitate advances in the field through cooperative research and education.

In our commentary, we will address ways to consider this research across the cancer continuum, with a focus on the cancer survivor, highlighting some of the challenges in interpreting the research evidence for translation into clinical practice and noting some research gaps.

Exercise and physical activity are beneficial along the spectrum of care in cancer patients. However, much more research is needed to better understand this association and guide recommendations for patients.

This article will review these intersections of exercise and oncology, discuss the known mechanisms by which exercise exerts its salutary effects, and touch upon the future directions of exercise research in the oncology setting. Finally, recommendations are provided for clinicians to help patients with and without cancer take advantage of the benefits of physical activity.

If MGTs could predict which patients were most prone to late recurrence and thus might benefit from extended adjuvant endocrine therapy, it would be a huge advancement in the care and survivorship of our patients. More studies of MGTs are required to clarify their role in evaluating prognosis and predicting response to therapy in breast cancer.

Localized prostate cancer treatment with surgery or radiation results in similar long-term side effects, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence.

The annual report to the nation on the status of cancer in the United States, published Monday, shows cancer death rates overall continue to decline. The number of people who die as a result of their cancer has been steadily declining since the 1990s, and over the 9-year period between 2000 and 2009, the report shows a 1.8% decrease in death rates per year among men and a 1.4% decrease among women.

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