Oncology NEWS International Vol 10 No 8

Amifostine Can Reduce Xerostomia, Loss of Taste, Fibrosis, and Pain

August 02, 2001

ZUHL, Germany-Amifostine (Ethyol) used as cytoprotective therapy can reduce the occurrence of xero-stomia, loss of taste, and fibrosis associated with radiochemotherapy for head and neck cancer. Results of three studies were reported by Jens Buentzel, MD, PhD, vice chairman of the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Oncology, Zentralklinikum Zuhl, Germany.

Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Reduces Rectal Damage in Prostate Cancer Treatment

August 02, 2001

ST. LOUIS-Three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy is being widely used for treatment of prostate cancer and has been successful at reducing rectal toxicities. "Conformal radiotherapy has allowed dose escalation with acceptable or even reduced rates of severe morbidity," Jeff M. Michalski, MD, reported. He added, however, that "we have to start paying attention to the low-grade morbidity. Grade 1 and grade 2 toxicity may predict development of severe late complications." Dr. Michalski is assistant professor of radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis.

Can Concurrent Amifostine and 5-FU Permit Delivery of Higher Boost Doses of Radiation?

August 02, 2001

ST. LOUIS-Soon to be launched is a trial to determine if amifostine (Ethyol) with concurrent infusion of 5-fluorouracil will permit delivery of higher boost doses of radiation in unresectable or locally recurrent rectal cancer.

Preventing Severe Esophagitis Critical in Chemoradiotherapy for Lung Cancer

August 02, 2001

PHILADELPHIA-Concurrent chemoradiotherapy seems likely to become standard therapy for treating locally advanced lung cancer. That would make preventing radiation-induced esophagitis even more important, according to Maria Werner-Wasik, MD.

Upcoming Trial to Test Ability of Amifostine to Reduce Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism

August 02, 2001

ST. LOUIS-To determine whether cytoprotective amifostine (Ethyol) can reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy, a trial is set to begin at Washington University in St. Louis. The proposed trial is currently undergoing institutional review board (IRB) consideration and has not yet enrolled patients.

Amifostine Offers Little Advantage in Small Trial of Twice-Daily Radiation Plus Chemotherapy

August 02, 2001

ST LOUIS-In a small phase II study, amifostine (Ethyol) provided little advantage in esophageal protection for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) treated with chemotherapy and twice-daily radiation. Results of the trial were reported by Todd H. Wasserman, MD. Dr. Wasserman is professor of radiation oncology and clinical chief, Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis.

Subcutaneous Amifostine Provides Protection Against Radiation-Induced Acute Xerostomia

August 02, 2001

PHILADELPHIA-For head and neck cancer patients, subcutaneous (SC) amifostine (Ethyol) provides equal protection against radiation-induced grade 2 acute xerostomia compared to intravenous (IV) amifostine, Pramila Rani Anné, MD, reported. She cautioned, however, that SC amifostine should be used only in clinical trials until ways to prevent cutaneous toxicities are worked out.

Study to Test Amifostine in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Combined-Modality Therapy

August 02, 2001

CHICAGO-Cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy has greater efficacy than previous regimens in treating cervical cancer, but toxicity needs to be reduced, stated William Small, Jr., MD. He is assistant professor of radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, at Northwestern University’s Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago.

Radioprotectants May Extend Use of Combined Chemotherapy and Radiation

August 02, 2001

ST. CROIX-The discovery that radioprotectants can be used in some settings to protect normal tissues from radiation damage promises to greatly extend the usefulness of regimens that combine systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The First Investigators’ Congress on Radioprotection, held June 7 to 10, 2001 served as a forum to review current progress and discuss new developments in strategies for radioprotection.

Amifostine Ameliorates Pneumonitis and Esophagitis During Radiochemotherapy

August 02, 2001

HOUSTON-Amifostine (Ethyol) can reduce the risk of acute pneumonitis and severe esophagitis associated with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy administered to patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results of a phase III study were reported by Ritsuko Komaki, MD, professor of radiation oncology at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

Potentially Useful Predictors of Risk for Developing Postradiation Pneumonitis

August 02, 2001

ROCHESTER, New York-Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin 1-alpha (IL-1a) are potentially useful predictors of risk for development of postradiation pneumonitis, according to Yuhchyau Chen, MD, PhD. "Delayed peak of pneumonitis occurs at 6 to 9 months, and we expect that there will be a role for radioprotective agents in this setting," she said. Dr. Chen is assistant professor of radiation oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, New York.

Amifostine Trial Represents First FDA Approval of Treatment Interacting With Radiation

August 02, 2001

DURHAM, North Carolina-"We have a positive randomized trial of amifostine (Ethyol), and it represents the first time that a treatment has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that interacts with radiation therapy," David M. Brizel, MD, said.

Amifostine Reduces Side Effects During Treatment for Advanced Lung Cancer

August 02, 2001

PIREAUS, Greece-In advanced-stage lung cancer, radiation therapy provides effective local-regional control but requires irradiation of large tissue volumes and high total tumor doses. "Bolus tumor doses higher than 60 Gy produce better local tumor control but more toxicity," Dosia Antonadou, MD, explained.

Intrarectal Amifostine Prevents Late Rectal Complications of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

August 02, 2001

DETROIT-Intrarectal topical application of amifostine (Ethyol), given as a "mini-enema," is extremely tolerable, produces no systemic toxicity, and may be an alternative to systemic administration for preventing rectal damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Results of a phase I study were reported by Edgar Ben-Josef, MD. He is associate professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Wayne State University’s Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit.

Experts Consider Statistical Issues in Designing Studies of Toxicity Modifiers

August 02, 2001

PHILADELPHIA-In designing trials of potential toxicity modifiers, consideration must be given to endpoint selection and correlation of endpoints, as well as sample size and analysis methods. Important design factors were reviewed by Charles B. Scott, PhD, associate director of quality of life research at the American College of Radiology in Philadelphia.

Preclinical Studies Support Use of Subcutaneous Amifostine Prior to Radiation Therapy to Protect Against Mucositis

August 02, 2001

GAITHERSBURG, Maryland-Animal studies of amifostine (Ethyol) are being used to explore optimal subcutaneous (SC) treatment and to refine approaches to dosing and scheduling of the radioprotectant. David R. Cassatt, PhD, of MedImmune, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland, described current preclinical work with amifostine.

Amifostine May Mimic Antitumor Gene Therapy

August 02, 2001

CHICAGO-Amifostine (Ethyol) has a number of effects on transcription factors and may also mimic antitumor gene therapy by upregulating expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), according to David J. Grdina, MBA, PhD, professor of radiation and cellular oncology at the University of Chicago.

Reducing Toxicity of Combined-Modality Treatment for Esophageal Cancer

August 02, 2001

SAN ANTONIO, Texas-Although combined-modality therapy is considered the standard of care for patients with advanced esophageal cancer, the anatomical and physiological characteristics of the esophagus pose serious limitations on dose escalation. Cytoprotective strategies that might allow clinicians to circumvent these limitations were reviewed by Charles R. Thomas. Jr., MD.

Better Radiation Toxicity Standards Needed in Both Clinical Trials and Practice

August 02, 2001

TAMPA, Florida-Standards for reporting toxicity related to radiotherapy are at least 5 years behind those developed for chemotherapy and need to be improved before the field can advance, according to Andy Trotti, MD. "There is a need for a common late effects grading system and a need for reporting standards," Dr. Trotti said. He is program leader and director of clinical trials, Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.

Refining Targets to Reduce Late-Appearing Radiation Side Effects in Head and Neck Cancer

August 02, 2001

ST. LOUIS-Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and use of radioprotectant agents may help reduce late-appearing radiation side effects, reported K. S. Clifford Chao, MD. Dr. Chao is associated radiation oncologist, Department of Radiation Oncology at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.

Dr. Shapiro’s Real-Life Tribute to Oncology Nurses

August 01, 2001

SAN DIEGO-In his keynote address-"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Chemotherapy"-Daniel Shapiro, PhD, used his gift for stand-up comedy to relay an important message: Everyday, in ways they don’t even realize, oncology nurses make a huge difference in patients’ lives.

US Records Another Overall Drop in Cancer Death Rates

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-US cancer and AIDS mortality declined again in 1999, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The preliminary age-adjusted death rate fell 0.9% for cancer and 3.6% for HIV disease.

Restructured HCFA Now Has a New Name

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-The Bush Administration has begun a reorganization of the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) by changing its name and creating three new centers to administer its activities. The agency is now the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The three new centers, according to CMS, "reflect the agency’s major lines of business."

Oncologists Educate Congress on New Treatment Advances

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-Oncology is in transition from its traditional methods of diagnosing and treating cancer to a reliance on molecular changes within cells-and the science behind this paradigm shift will lead to new drugs to attack precancerous conditions as well, several cancer researchers said at a congressional briefing.

Fatigue Difficult to Isolate From Related Cancer Symptoms

August 01, 2001

PHILADELPHIA-A study presented at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress in San Diego underscores the challenge of managing cancer-related fatigue: Fatigue frequently is part of a cluster of interrelated symptoms, such as pain, depression, and poor sleep quality.

No Survival Benefit for Transplant in Metastatic Breast Cancer

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-High-dose adjuvant chemotherapy with stem cell support provided no overall or disease-free survival benefit over standard chemotherapy in a randomized, multicenter Italian trial including 398 metastatic breast cancer patients.

Oncology Nursing Society Has the Power to Shape Health Care Policy: The President’s Address

August 01, 2001

SAN DIEGO-Power to shape health care policy and practice was on the minds of thousands of oncology nurses who attended the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress. Roused by their leaders and a mariachi band marching down the aisle of the Convention Center at the opening session, more than 5,000 nurses from around the world proclaimed in unison, "We will be heard! We will be heard! We will be heard!"

Use of Ambulatory Pumps Prevents Long Patient Waits in Infusion Unit

August 01, 2001

BOSTON-Outpatient infusion units around the country have experienced soaring numbers of patients due to changes in reimbursement as well as increasingly complex cancer treatments. In a move that contributed to this growth, oncologists at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), supported by the literature, began giving 2-hour infusions of pamidronate (Aredia®) for prevention of skeletal complications from several malignancies.

Iressa Targets HER2-Overexpressing Tumors That Coexpress HER1

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-Potentially therapeutic concentrations of ZD1839 (Iressa) inhibit phosphorylation in HER2-overexpressing breast tumor cell lines that coexpress HER1, Stacy Moulder, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Rehabilitation Group Significantly Reduces Fatigue-Related Stress

August 01, 2001

TAMPA, Florida-A rehabilitation group program-Energy for Living With Cancer-has the ability to reduce fatigue-related distress and improve quality of life, according to program developer Sandra Holley, PhD, ARNP, a nurse scientist at the James A. Haley Veterans Administration Medical Center, Tampa. Dr. Holley presented her results in a poster session at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress.

Pegfilgrastim Offers Once-Per-Cycle G-CSF Dosing

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-Administering a single dose of pegylated filgrastim (pegfilgrastim) each chemotherapy cycle is as effective as daily doses of filgrastim (Neupogen) in reducing neutropenia among breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy, according to two studies presented at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Nurses Participate in Ethics Rounds at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

August 01, 2001

HOUSTON-Cancer patients receiving aggressive treatment often face difficult decisions. Nurses will often help patients and their families through them-but the nurses may need support themselves, says a nurse who co-authored a study looking at nurse utilization of hospital ethics rounds.

Oncology Nurse Shortage ‘Will Get Worse Before It Gets Better’

August 01, 2001

PITTSBURGH-Two recent reports by the Health Resources and Services Administration spotlight a difficult situation in health care today, both for providers and patients. The agency’s 2000 "National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses" found a significant decline in the rate of increase for people entering nursing-from 14.2% between 1992 and 1996, to 4.1% between 1996 and 2000-at a time of greater population growth and aging.

Survivor Volunteer Program Provides Support for Newly Diagnosed Patients

August 01, 2001

BALTIMORE-Women undergoing breast cancer treatment at the Johns Hopkins Breast Center receive extensive emotional support from breast cancer survivor volunteers, thanks to an ongoing program there. Lillie Shockney, RN, MAS, director of education and outreach, described the development and implementation of the program at a poster session at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress.

Teaching Video Helps Transplant Patients Learn Central Line Care

August 01, 2001

INDIANAPOLIS-Transplant patients may maintain a central line for 6 months to a year. At high risk for infection, they must know how to take care of their line. But when do they learn? Teachable moments can be few and far between, according to Indiana University Hospital nurses who made a video to help solve the problem.

President Seeks to Settle Federal Tobacco Lawsuit

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-The tobacco wars continue in the nation’s capital. The Bush Administration has announced it will seek a settlement of the federal lawsuit against the tobacco industry, initiated during the Clinton Administration to recover profits the industry made through alleged fraudulent practices.

No Survival Advantage for High-Dose vs Standard Chemotherapy

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-High-dose chemotherapy plus stem cell rescue did not improve overall survival vs standard chemotherapy alone in women with chemotherapy-sensitive metastatic breast cancer, according to the results of a National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) trial reported at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Greater Attention to Palliative and Supportive Care Urged Patients

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-The nation needs to greatly improve the palliative and supportive care provided to cancer patients from diagnosis through death, according to a new report by the National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), part of the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine. The report made a series of recommendations intended to break down or lower the barriers to excellent care for people with cancer.

Prophylactic Mastectomy Effective in Mutation Carriers

August 01, 2001

ROTTERDAM, The Netherlands-In the first prospective study of its kind, prophylactic mastectomy prevented the development of breast cancer in women at high risk for breast cancer because of BRCA1/2 mutations, compared with controls who did not opt for surgery.

Oncology Nurses Share Their Experiences With Patient Requests for Assisted Dying

August 01, 2001

AUSTIN, Texas-Although the nursing profession supports patient empowerment and self-determination in health care decision-making, patient requests for assisted dying raise difficult issues. A study reported at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Conference explored the symptom management strategies that some nurses use to either counter or preempt patient requests for help in dying.

Chemo + Cytoreduction Ups Survival in Liver Met Patients

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-Colorectal cancer patients with unresectable liver metastases responded better to a regimen of regional and systemic chemotherapy plus cytoreduction than to cytoreduction alone, said David Litvak, MD, of the John Wayne Cancer Institute, Santa Monica, and Century City Hospital, Los Angeles.

Patients Receiving Radioimmunotherapy Must Practice Radiation Safety Precautions

August 01, 2001

SAN DIEGO-Lead aprons, radiation badges, and patient laundry are not the normal concerns of nurses. But as new radioimmunotherapy agents are evaluated and introduced into practice, nurses will need to familiarize themselves with radiation safety precautions, said Patricia A. Kramer, RN, MSN, a San Francisco-based oncology nurse educator and consultant. Patient education and instruction throughout the whole process is key.

FIRE Project Shows Walking Program Decreases Fatigue in Breast Cancer Patients

August 01, 2001

BALTIMORE-What is safe, efficacious, and cost-effective, not swallowed or taken intravenously, and improves a breast cancer patient’s quality of life? Exercise, according to a group of researchers who conducted a multi-institutional, prospective, randomized controlled trial examining the effects of a supervised walking regimen on breast cancer patients.

Long Island Cancer Center to Partner With Community

August 01, 2001

STONY BROOK, NY-The new Long Island Cancer Center at Stony Brook University is welcoming the community into a partnership in cancer research, John S. Kovach, MD, founding director of the Center, told ONI in an interview.

Experimental Vaccine Produces Colorectal Cancer Responses

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-A new approach to stimulating the immune system against a cancer antigen has produced a clinical response in a small number of colorectal cancer patients enrolled in a phase I/II trial, according to a poster presented at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Senate Committee Hears Expert Testimony on Blood Cancers

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-Witnesses at the first-ever Congressional hearing on hematologic cancers urged Congress to act on the recommendations of the Leukemia-Lymphoma-Myeloma Progress Review Group (LLM-PRG). This group, composed of more than 180 researchers, clinicians, patient advocates, industry representatives, and government officials, released its report last May.

Melanoma Screening Yield Is High for Older, At-Risk Men

August 01, 2001

NEW YORK-Among men over age 50 with an additional melanoma risk factor, diagnostic yield of melanoma screening is 1 in 219, data from the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) National Skin Cancer Screening Program show. That yield is high, suggesting the potential cost-effectiveness of this intervention, according to Barbara A. Gilchrest, MD, professor and chairman of dermatology, Boston University.

Docetaxel Regimen Better Tolerated Than Doxorubicin in Adjuvant Breast Cancer Setting

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-Results are now emerging regarding the use of docetaxel (Taxotere) in the adjuvant breast cancer setting. A large study presented at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) evaluated the adjuvant use of docetaxel plus cyclophosphamide (TC 75/600 mg/m²) and found it to be better tolerated than standard doxorubicin (Adriamycin) plus cyclophosphamide (AC 60/600 mg/m²).

Roswell Park’s Fifth Vital Sign Program Boosts Pain Assessment

August 01, 2001

BUFFALO, NY-A pain intensity assessment program undertaken at Roswell Park Cancer Institute has been successful in increasing staff assessment of pain and in promoting optimal pain management. Reporting at a poster session at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress, Jacqueline L. Massey, RN, MS, assistant director of nursing, described the development of the Center’s comprehensive program, known as the Fifth Vital Sign.

J. Craig Venter, PhD, Lectures on Human Genome Sequencing

August 01, 2001

BUFFALO, NY-Former Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) faculty member J. Craig Venter, PhD, founder and president of Celera Genomics, returned to the Buffalo-based comprehensive cancer center to present the Institute’s Cori Lecture (see box).

Dietary Changes May Help Prevent Skin Cancer, Expert Says

August 01, 2001

NEW YORK-A variety of simple dietary interventions could prove effective in inhibiting carcinogenesis and reducing the incidence of skin cancers, said James M. Spencer, MD, associate professor of dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

High- vs Intermediate-Dose Chemotherapy in Stage II/IIIa Breast Cancer

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9082 has failed in its second analysis to show a survival benefit for intensive therapy and transplant in primary breast cancer patients with multiple positive axillary lymph nodes. Nevertheless, outcomes in the 785-patient study, which compared high-dose and intermediate-dose consolidation chemotherapy with alkylating agents, are superior to outcomes achieved in studies of standard-dose therapy alone, William P. Peters, MD, PhD, said on behalf of investigators in the study, which was started more than 10 years ago. Dr. Peters, director of the Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, spoke at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Type of Exercise May Affect Fatigue in Patients Receiving Catabolic Steroids

August 01, 2001

PORTLAND, Oregon -Aerobic exercise may be more effective than resistance exercise in reducing cancer-related fatigue among patients taking catabolic steroids, according to a study presented at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress, held in San Diego.

Susan Newton, ‘a Woman With a Cause,’ Receives FIRE Project Excellence Award

August 01, 2001

SAN DIEGO-Susan A. Newton, RN, MS, AOCN, is an independent consultant based in Dayton, Ohio, who travels throughout Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky teaching patients and colleagues, regionally and nationally, about cancer-related fatigue and pain management.

DIRI Promising in Evaluating Drug Response

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-A highly sensitive photon sensor has shown promise as a means of detecting early, subtle responses to neoadjuvant therapy among patients with soft tissue sarcomas, investigators from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute reported at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

WISECARE Project Networks European Nurses, Promotes Evidence-Based Care

August 01, 2001

SAN DIEGO, California-The Workflow Information Systems for European Nursing Care (WISECARE) program is using information technology to foster knowledge sharing and to promote evidence-based nursing care among 15 European cancer centers.

Oncology Nurses Take Initiative With Three Innovative Programs

August 01, 2001

At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, nurses are recruiting newly diagnosed cancer patients into a smoking cessation program. At Marshfield Clinic Cancer Care, Marshfield, Wisconsin, nurses are teaching phlebotomists how to do venous access device (VAD) blood draws. And at St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland, nurses have made depression assessment part of standard oncology care.

KGF Reduces Severe Painful Oral Mucositis After Transplantation

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-In a phase II trial, recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF, or KGF) significantly reduced severe mucositis and improved quality of life for patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation.

Double Reading Mammograms Increases Cancer Detection Rate, Costs

August 01, 2001

SEATTLE-Double reading mammograms increases breast cancer detection rates but not without substantial costs, according to a study done at Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont, and presented at the 101st Annual Meeting of the American Roentgen Ray Society.

JCAHO Visit an ‘Opportunity’ to Improve Pain Management

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-With a Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) visit looming, nurses at George Washington University Hospital used the opportunity to implement a staff education program to improve pain assessment and management.

Atrasentan May Delay Advanced Prostate Cancer Progression

August 01, 2001

SAN FRANCISCO-Atrasentan (ABT-627), an investigational endothelin-A receptor antagonist made by Abbott Laboratories, appears to delay clinical progression, PSA progression, and bone progression in hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients, according to phase II clinical trials presented at the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Frequent Application of Sunscreen Essential to Avoid Sunburns

August 01, 2001

NEW YORK-Many persons who apply sunscreen before spending time outdoors are nevertheless increasing their risk of skin cancer by not applying sunscreen frequently enough to prevent sunburn, recent studies involving skiers at high altitudes suggest.

New Directions in Cancer-Related Cognitive Impairment, Fatigue, and Pain: Symposium

August 01, 2001

SAN DIEGO, California-A symposium at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 26th Annual Congress addressed the challenges of managing cancer-related cognitive impairment, fatigue, and pain. Each of three speakers gave an overview of one of these problems, including contributing factors and current research, and then discussed new approaches to symptom management.

FDA Reviews Its Policies With Cancer Patient Advocates

August 01, 2001

WASHINGTON-The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plans to review potential new endpoints for use in approving cancer drugs. The decision-making process will include public discussions involving practicing oncologists, academic physicians, the pharmaceutical industry, and advocacy groups.