Oncology NEWS International Vol 13 No 1

Stopping Smoking May Increase Breast Cancer Survival

January 01, 2004

SALT LAKE CITY-Women who continue to smoke during treatment for early breast cancer have more than double the risk of death, compared with those who have never smoked or those who quit the habit before their treatment, according to a study presented at the 45th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO abstract 2024).

Neoadjuvant Anastrozole Permits Breast Conservation

January 01, 2004

SAN ANTONIO-Neoadjuvant anastrozole (Arimidex, A) produced about the same rate of clinical responses as tamoxifen (T) or combined anastrozole/tamoxifen (AT) in estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer and was better than either for shrinking tumors enough to permit breast-conserving surgery, researchers reported at the 26th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (abstract 1).

Antisense May Potentiate DTIC Efficacy

January 01, 2004

NEW YORK-Adding an antisense agent (oblimersen sodium, Genasense) to standard dacarbazine (DTIC) may significantly improve overall survival with only a slight increase in adverse effects, compared with DTIC alone, according to initial results from the largest-ever phase III trial in advanced metastatic melanoma. "We may have actually made a difference in overall survival in patients with metastatic melanoma," said researcher Anna C. Pavlick, DO, assistant professor of oncology, New York University School of Medicine.

Physical Examination Is Still Important for Detecting Breast Ca, Especially in Young Women

January 01, 2004

SALT LAKE CITY-Physical examination of the breasts by a woman and her health care provider remains an important means of detecting breast cancer, especially in young women, according to a study reported at the 45th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (abstract 194). The study found that physical examination was the sole method of breast cancer detection in nearly half of women younger than 40.

3D Virtual Colonoscopy as Sensitive as Conventional Test

January 01, 2004

CHICAGO-An advanced three-dimensional (3D) fly-through-reality form of virtual colonoscopy is an effective frontline screening tool for an average-risk, asymptomatic population, according to a prospective, multicenter trial. "It is accurate for finding clinically important polyps, and it is comparable in sensitivity to the accepted gold standard of conventional colonoscopy," Perry Pickhardt, MD, associate professor of radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, said at a press conference at the 89th Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).