Paul H. Sugarbaker, MD, FACS | Authors

Articles

Managing the Peritoneal Surface Component of Gastrointestinal Cancer: Part 2

February 01, 2004

Until recently, peritoneal carcinomatosis was a universally fatalmanifestation of gastrointestinal cancer. However, two innovations intreatment have improved outcome for these patients. The new surgicalinterventions are collectively referred to as peritonectomy procedures.During the peritonectomy, all visible cancer is removed in an attemptto leave the patient with only microscopic residual disease. Perioperativeintraperitoneal chemotherapy, the second innovation, is employed toeradicate small-volume residual disease. The intraperitoneal chemotherapyis administered intraoperatively with moderate hyperthermia.Part 1 of this two-part article, which appeared in the January issue,described the natural history of gastrointestinal cancer with carcinomatosis,the patterns of dissemination within the peritoneal cavity, andthe benefits and limitations of peritoneal chemotherapy. Peritonectomyprocedures were also defined and described. Part 2 discusses the mechanicsof delivering perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy andthe clinical assessments used to select patients who will benefit fromcombined treatment. The results of combined treatment as they vary inmucinous and nonmucinous tumors are also discussed.

Managing the Peritoneal Surface Component of Gastrointestinal Cancer; Part 1. Patterns of Dissemination and Treatment Options

January 01, 2004

Until recently, peritoneal carcinomatosis was a universally fatalmanifestation of gastrointestinal cancer. However, two innovations intreatment have improved outcome for these patients. The new surgicalinterventions are collectively referred to as peritonectomy procedures.During these procedures, all visible cancer is removed in an attempt toleave the patient with only microscopic residual disease. Perioperativeintraperitoneal chemotherapy, the second innovation, is employed toeradicate small-volume residual disease. The intraperitoneal chemotherapyis administered in the operating room with moderate hyperthermiaand is referred to as heated intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy.If tolerated, additional intraperitoneal chemotherapy canbe administered during the first 5 postoperative days. The use of thesecombined treatments, ie, cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy,improves survival, optimizes quality of life, and maximallypreserves function. Part 1 of this two-part article describes the naturalhistory of gastrointestinal cancer with carcinomatosis, the patterns ofdissemination within the peritoneal cavity, and the benefits and limitationsof peritoneal chemotherapy. Peritonectomy procedures are also definedand described. Part 2, to be published next month in this journal,discusses the mechanics of delivering perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapyand the clinical assessments used to select patients who willbenefit from combined treatment. The results of combined treatment asthey vary in mucinous and nonmucinous tumors are also discussed.

Use of Saline-Filled Tissue Expanders to Protect the Small Bowel from Radiation

January 01, 1998

Dr. Hoffman and colleagues have persisted in their efforts to provide a safe, reliable pelvic prosthesis to protect the small bowel during high-dose radiation therapy. I started using this type of plastic device in the early 1980s as part of the management of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer.[1,2] Similar to data reported by Drs. Hoffman, Sigurdson, and Eisenberg in this issue, my colleagues and I at the National Cancer Institute also noted a learning curve that accompanied our experience. We reported our experience with two iliac artery fistulas that occurred after extensive radiation therapy, possibly due to the prosthesis.[3] Sepsis within the irradiated field and surrounding the prosthesis led to a prosthesis-related death in one patient. A second patient who had multiple postoperative complications died of a pulmonary embolus.

Management of Primary and Metastatic Tumors to the Liver

June 01, 1996

Dr. Sardi and colleagues lay out, in a clear and concise fashion, current alternatives for the management of primary and metastatic liver tumors. Their emphasis on "high-value" treatments is crucial. In this group of patients, unnecessary treatments not only are costly in terms of dollars but also reduce the quality of the short life remaining in patients with unresectable disease.