Alan Blum, MD | Authors

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Articles

Confronting Americas Smoking Pandemic, Part 4: 2000–2016

October 18, 2016

Dr. Alan Blum and Cancer Network have partnered to assemble a four-part slideshow series addressing the history of America’s smoking pandemic. Part 4 highlights a period of further regulation on the tobacco industry, the advent of e-cigarettes, and more.

Confronting America’s Smoking Pandemic, Part 3: 1986–1999

May 04, 2016

Dr. Alan Blum and Cancer Network have partnered to assemble a four-part slideshow series addressing the history of America’s smoking pandemic. Part 3 highlights a period of regulation and legislation against the tobacco industry, and litigation in the form of class action and state lawsuits.

Confronting America’s Smoking Pandemic, Part 2: 1967–1985

December 16, 2015

Dr. Alan Blum and Cancer Network have partnered to assemble a four-part slideshow series addressing the history of America’s smoking pandemic. Part 2 highlights the rise of tobacco awareness, and anti-smoking activism and legislation.

Confronting America’s Smoking Pandemic, Part 1: 1939–1966

March 06, 2015

Ahead of the World Tobacco Congress, Dr. Alan Blum and Cancer Network have partnered to assemble a four-part slideshow series addressing the history of America’s smoking pandemic. Part 1 examines the early evidence linking smoking with cancer.

The Surgeon General vs the Marlboro Man: Who Really Won?

November 07, 2014

The images in this slide set are from an exhibition curated by Alan Blum, MD, at the University of Alabama Gorgas Library (November to December 2013) to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, released on January 11, 1964 by Dr. Luther Terry.

Blowing Smoke: The Lost Legacy of the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health

May 15, 2014

The 50th anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health is not a time for celebration, but rather one of sober reflection about missed opportunities. Our progress in reducing the prevalence of smoking is undeniable, but our current efforts have become more symbol than substance.