Edward L. Trimble, MD, PhD | Authors

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Articles

Use of IP Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer: The Critical Questions

February 21, 2011

The article by Dr. Echarri Gonzalez and her colleagues regarding intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy for women with epithelial ovarian cancer provides a comprehensive yet practical review of the critical questions surrounding the use of IP chemotherapy.

Intraperitoneal Therapy for Ovarian Cancer Reconsidered

February 01, 2007

Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy is a preferred treatment option that should be offered to all women for front-line treatment of stage III optimally debulked ovarian cancer. Patients should be provided with information on the survival and toxicity for both IP and intravenous (IV) therapies, as well as practical information about the administration of each regimen, so that they may play an active role in the decision-making process. When making a decision between IP and IV therapeutic options, the experience and preference of the oncologist are critical factors in determining appropriate therapy for each woman.

Ovarian Tumors of Low Malignant Potential

November 01, 2003

Clinical and laboratory reports suggest that ovarian tumors of lowmalignant potential (LMP) represent a “grab bag” of tumors, withdifferent etiologies, molecular biologies, and prognoses. As a result,data on incidence and prognosis may be quite unreliable. Diagnosis isbest made on permanent section. Half of women under age 40 undergoconservative, fertility-sparing surgery when diagnosed with anovarian tumor of LMP, but no adjuvant therapy has been shown toprolong survival in this population. In addition to the various controversiessurrounding LMP tumors, this review will address prognosticmarkers, risk of malignant transformation, treatment of progressivedisease, surveillance after conservative surgery, and future directionsfor research.

Clinical Trials in Ovarian Cancer, Part 2

December 01, 2002

The American Cancer Society has estimated that 23,300 women will develop ovarian cancer in 2002, and 13,900 women will die from the disease.[1] The 5-year survival rate is about 80% for women with stage I disease, 50% for women with stage II disease, 25% for women with stage III disease, and 15% for women with stage IV disease. Among women with advanced-stage disease, optimal debulking surgery, as well as platinum/taxane-based adjuvant therapy prolongs disease-free and median survival.[2,3] Population-based data suggest that guidelines for therapy are not uniformly followed in community practice.[4] In addition, older patients appear to receive less aggressive treatment than younger patients.

Clinical Trials in Ovarian Cancer, Part 1

November 01, 2002

The American Cancer Society has estimated that in 2002 ovarian cancer will strike 23,300 women, and 13,900 women will die from the disease.[1] Five-year survival is about 80% for women with stage I disease, 50% for women with stage II disease, 25% for women with stage III disease, and 15% for women with stage IV disease. Among women with advanced-stage disease, optimal debulking surgery, as well as platinum/taxane-based adjuvant therapy prolongs disease-free and median survival.[2,3] Population-based data suggests that guidelines for therapy are not uniformly followed in community practice.[4] In addition, older patients appear to receive less aggressive treatment than younger patients.

Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials

November 01, 2001

Clinical trials of agents to prevent cancer in populations at risk are relatively recent. To date, these consist of a few large population-based studies. Trials in this area focus on the prevention of cancer in individuals with specific predetermined risk

Investigator-Initiated Health-Related Quality-of-Life Research

September 01, 2001

In part I of this series, we identified currently active clinical trials that include health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes as a primary or secondary objective of the overall study (Trimble EL et al: ONCOLOGY 15:601-611, 2001). The goal of this

Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer Clinical Trials

May 01, 2001

The Clinical Trials Referral Resource that appeared in the April issue of ONCOLOGY began a series on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Part I of this series, which concludes this month, focuses on HRQOL questions in cancer treatment trials. Part II (on investigator-initiated HRQOL research) and part III (on HRQOL research as part of cancer prevention trials) will appear in upcoming issues. Information about these studies can be obtained from the contacts listed for each trial or from Edward L. Trimble, MD, MPH, at the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP), trimble@ctep.nci.nih.gov or (301) 496-1196

Health-Related Quality of Life in Cancer Clinical Trials

April 01, 2001

Over the past 15 years, research into the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of cancer patients has expanded dramatically. We have seen the development of a variety of instruments to assess both global HRQOL as well as cancer-specific symptoms. These instruments have been validated in a variety of populations. Many of the instruments have been translated into multiple languages. We have also seen the development of instruments to evaluate HRQOL in children and in adults with low literacy levels. We have learned how to integrate HRQOL questions into cancer clinical trials and how to facilitate the collection of QOL data from patients and their families. We are now beginning to evaluate interventions to maintain and enhance HRQOL among cancer patients and cancer survivors.

Commentary (Trimble/Trimble): Update on Low Malignant Potential Ovarian Tumors

June 01, 2000

Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (LMP) would benefit from a new name, not to mention a deeper understanding of their biology, effective treatment, and a framework within which they can be studied. Fortunately, for a pathologic entity that is poorly understood and also is unresponsive to current therapy, most LMP ovarian tumors carry a benign prognosis.