Author | Jay S. Cooper, MD

Articles

AIDS-Related Malignancies

November 01, 2015

Malignancies have been detected in approximately 40% of all patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) sometime during the course of their illness.

Cancer Management Chapter 24: AIDS-related malignancies

March 12, 2010

Malignancies have been detected in approximately 40% of all patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) sometime during the course of their illness. These cancers have been both a primary cause of death in some patients and also a source of considerable morbidity. In the current era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are surviving longer than ever. HAART appears to have substantially reduced the incidence of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and may enhance the efficacy of treatment for those patients who do develop these tumors. Unfortunately, HAART has not shown a similar effect on the development of other types of neoplasms, and caring for patients who develop malignancies in the setting of HIV remains a challenge. Furthermore, HAART is not available universally, with many patients in resource-poor developing countries not having access to antiretroviral drugs.

Rapidly Growing Options for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

September 01, 2008

In the past, locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer routinely was treated by surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy, unless the disease was too extensive to be resected and treatment defaulted to radiation therapy alone.

Metastatic Paraganglioma: An Uncommon Manifestation of an Uncommon Disease

March 01, 2008

In this edition of Clinical Quandaries, Trombetta et al present a 64-year-old man who seeks care because of a new, asymptomatic right midneck mass. Because the mass is not warm or tender and the patient does not have an elevated temperature, an infectious etiology is unlikely. We are not told if he is a smoker or drinker and we assume he does not have any other signs or symptoms (such as recent-onset hoarseness) that would point us to a head and neck cancer as a primary source.