ONCOLOGY Vol 25 No 12_Suppl_2 | Oncology

Current Challenges in the Management of Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

November 15, 2011

For patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who experience relapse, important advances in medical therapies in the past decade have doubled the duration of survival, mainly because of the effectiveness of novel agents such as thalidomide (Thalomid), bortezomib (Velcade), and lenalidomide (Revlimid).[1]

Comparative Mechanisms of Action of Proteasome Inhibitors

November 07, 2011

The proteasome is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of a small but increasing number of diseases- most notably, B cell malignancies. Multiple myeloma (MM) is one of the first diseases for which proteasome inhibitors (PIs) have been validated and in which they have found widespread use.

The Future of Proteasome Inhibitors in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

November 15, 2011

Bortezomib (Velcade), the first-in-class inhibitor of the proteasome,[1] or multicatalytic proteinase complex,[2] was originally found to be active against relapsed and relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma as a single agent in phase I through III clinical trials.[3-6

Treatment-Related Adverse Events in Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

November 15, 2011

The rational development of novel targeted therapies is expanding treatment options for patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) multiple myeloma (MM). The first-in-class proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib (Velcade), the immunomodulatory agents thalidomide (Thalomid) and lenalidomide (Revlimid), and liposomal doxorubicin are currently the major approved therapeutic agents in this setting.[1]

Multiple Myeloma: A Clinical Overview

November 15, 2011

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant, progressive plasma cell tumor characterized by overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulins, osteolytic bone lesions, renal disease, and immunodeficiency.[1] Before the 1980s, patients with MM experienced a slow, progressive decline in quality of life until death approximately 2 years after diagnosis.