Dr. Rabson Named Acting Director of the National Cancer Institute

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Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 10 No 12
Volume 10
Issue 12

BETHESDA, Maryland-Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy G. Thompson has named Alan S. Rabson, MD, deputy director of the National Cancer Institute since 1995, to serve as acting director of the Institute. Dr. Rabson will fill the post formerly held by Richard D. Klausner, MD, until a new director is named. Dr. Klausner resigned to become president of the new Case Institute of Health, Science, and Technology.

BETHESDA, Maryland—Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy G. Thompson has named Alan S. Rabson, MD, deputy director of the National Cancer Institute since 1995, to serve as acting director of the Institute. Dr. Rabson will fill the post formerly held by Richard D. Klausner, MD, until a new director is named. Dr. Klausner resigned to become president of the new Case Institute of Health, Science, and Technology.

Dr. Rabson came to the National Institutes of Health in 1955 as a resident in pathologic anatomy and joined the NCI a year later, where he pursued research in viral oncology. In 1975, he became director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, Diagnosis, and Centers.

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