Promising Results in First Randomized Trial of a Colon Cancer Vaccine

Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 9 No 2
Volume 9
Issue 2

CHICAGO-Using a patient’s own tumor cells to produce immunity against further cancer growth may improve survival in some patients, researchers have found in the first randomized multicenter test of immunotherapy in colon cancer. The 7-year, 412-patient trial, conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, shows the promise of adjuvant active specific immunotherapy in stage II/ III colon cancer, said lead author Jules E. Harris, MD, of Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center.

CHICAGO—Using a patient’s own tumor cells to produce immunity against further cancer growth may improve survival in some patients, researchers have found in the first randomized multicenter test of immunotherapy in colon cancer. The 7-year, 412-patient trial, conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, shows the promise of adjuvant active specific immunotherapy in stage II/ III colon cancer, said lead author Jules E. Harris, MD, of Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center.

The study compared surgery alone vs surgery followed by immunotherapy. Although there was no overall survival benefit, patients who were sensitive to the vaccine, as measured by a skin test, did well. Overall 5-year survival was approximately 63%, but was 84.6% among patients most sensitive to the vaccine, and as low as 45% in patients who were only somewhat sensitive ( J Clin Oncol 18:148-157, 1999).

The vaccine was made using cells obtained from the patient’s own tumor tissue, which were then irradiated and mixed with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG). Patients received two injections of the vaccine and a final dose of irradiated tumor cells alone.

Related Videos
Data from a ctDNA analysis of the phase 3 INTRIGUE study indicate that KIT mutational status may be associated with response to certain Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in GIST, according to an expert from the Yale Cancer Center in New Haven, Massachusetts.
Future research into the management of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma may involve combining local therapies with checkpoint inhibitors like durvalumab and tremelimumab, according to Ghassan K. Abou-Alda, MD.
Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma who have recurrent disease following surgery or locally advanced diseases who will likely progress on local therapy may have an opportunity to benefit from tremelimumab and durvalumab following its FDA approval, according to Ghassan K. Abou-Alfa, MD.
Ghassan K. Abou-Alfa, MD, discusses the importance of improving access to novel therapies and combinations for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma across the world.
Ghassan K. Abou-Alfa, MD, spoke about the recent approval of tremelimumab plus durvalumab for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, based on results from the phase 3 HIMALAYA trial.
Howard A. Burris, MD, highlighted previous findings of the phase 3 TOPAZ-1 trial assessing durvalumab plus gemcitabine and cisplatin vs placebo plus gemcitabine and cisplatin in advanced biliary tract cancer and patient-reported outcomes (PRO)data that were presented at 2022 ASCO.
Shubham Pant, MD discusses key findings from a basket trial examining the use of erdafitinib in patients with gastrointestinal cancers.
Related Content