Recent Data Validate Shorter Radiation Duration in Prostate Cancer

Video

Trial results presented at a recent medical conference demonstrated that the use of shorter duration radiation is safe and effective in prostate cancer, as well as a type of rare cancer, according to an expert.

Findings from a trial with 7 years of follow-up have confirmed that treatment with hypofractionated radiation—fewer radiation treatments at larger doses—is both safe and effective in patients with prostate cancer, according to an expert.

Louis Potters, MD, FACR, FABS, FASTRO, spoke with CancerNetwork® about some of the standout developments in the radiation oncology space presented in the 2022 American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting.

Potters, who is the chair of the Department of Radiation Medicine and deputy physician-in-chief of Northwell Health Cancer Institute In New Hyde Park, New York, highlighted findings from the PCS5 trial (NCT01444820), which indicated the non-inferiority of using hypofractionated radiotherapy to treat patients with prostate cancer compared with conventional fractionation.1

Additionally, he spoke about results from another trial (NCT02494700) showing that low-dose radiation for patients with orbital indolent B-cell lymphoma successfully demonstrated disease control and reduced toxicity.2

Transcript:

In the prostate area, there was further affirmation of the PCS5 trial with 7-year data now affirming the utilization of hypofractionation as a non-inferior study without an increase in toxicity or [adverse] effects. That just further validates the utilization of a shorter treatment course as definitive care for prostate cancer. There was a great study that was presented from the MSK group on the use of low-dose radiation for ocular lymphomas and utilizing very low doses to avoid the complications associated with treating an orbit or an eye with radiation therapy. They've been able to demonstrate successful disease control as well as less toxicity and/or complications.

References

  1. Niazi TM, Nabid A, Malagon T, et al. Conventional vs. hypofractionated, radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer: 7-year outcomes of the randomized, non-inferiority, phase 3 PCS5 trial. Presented at 2022 American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting (ASTRO); October 23-26, 2022; San Antonio, TX. Abstract 4. Accessed November 7, 2022.
  2. Pinnix CC, Dabaja B, Gunther JR, et al. Response adapted ultra low dose radiation therapy for the definitive management of orbital indolent B-cell lymphoma. Presented at 2022 American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting (ASTRO); October 23-26, 2022; San Antonio, TX. Abstract 3. Accessed November 7, 2022.
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