Molecular Profiling for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and the Future of the Disease

September 25, 2020

According to researchers, a “better understanding of the heterogeneity of mCRC, including primary tumor location, microsatellite instability (MSI) status, and other clinically actionable tumor mutations, is reshaping the therapeutic landscape.”

Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) continues to be a leading cause of cancer death in the US, though research is beginning to demonstrate that an alteration of the course of this disease could be possible with innovative interventions.

In an article recently published in the journal Oncology®, Benjamin A. Weinberg, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancers, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Samantha A. Armstrong, MD, a third year medical hematology/oncology fellow at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Rita Malley, MS, a third year medical student at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, reviewed the current molecular profiling practice for mCRC along with its prognostic implications and possible therapeutic targets.

“A better understanding of the heterogeneity of mCRC, including primary tumor location, microsatellite instability (MSI) status, and other clinically actionable tumor mutations, is reshaping the therapeutic landscape,” the researchers wrote.

In an interview with CancerNetwork®, Weinberg and Armstrong discussed the article further and what the future may hold for colorectal cancer research.

This segment comes from the CancerNetwork® portion of the MJH Life Sciences Medical World News, airing daily on all MJH Life Sciences channels.

Reference:

Armstrong SA, Malley R, Weinberg BA. Molecular Profiling in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer. Oncology. https://cdn.sanity.io/files/0vv8moc6/cancernetwork/baf3b12394a1c67d13040953072f4eef92c89724.pdf