'Lights, Camera, Action!' Movie Posters Help Kids Cope With Cancer in the Family

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Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 15 No 7
Volume 15
Issue 7

As part of the "Good Grief" support groups at the Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital, children coping with the illness or death of a loved one from cancer are the stars of their own movie posters, complete with the name of their fictional movie, story line, characters, and opening date (generally the child's birthday).

As part of the "Good Grief" support groups at the Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital, children coping with the illness or death of a loved one from cancer are the stars of their own movie posters, complete with the name of their fictional movie, story line, characters, and opening date (generally the child's birthday). "Story lines often revolve around hating the cancer and loving their families," said Pauline King, RN, director of children's programs. "These aren't things children would innately say, but through this process, they communicate their feelings." Younger children often dress up as superheroes, princesses, or fairies, while teenagers often portray themselves as action heroes. Some brandish lasers and swords, trying to kill the cancer. "This is an art form the children can really relate to, and the posters help them process their grief in a very personal way," Ms. King said.

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