Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go: Is Next-Generation Sequencing a Right for Patients with GI Cancers?

Podcast

The newest episode of “Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go” features 2 competing opinions on next-generation sequencing for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers.

In the latest episode of “Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go,” CancerNetwork examines a Q&A piece in the August issue of the journal ONCOLOGY discussing next-generation sequencing for gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. The article is titled “Ushering in the Era of Precision Medicine” and it focuses on a conversation with Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix, Arizona.

For a responding perspective, CancerNetwork spoke with Howard Hochster, MD, of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Dr. Hochster, who is also co-editor in chief of ONCOLOGY, discussed his feelings regarding next-generation sequencing, and suggests alternative ways to treat patients with GI cancers.

Don’t forget to subscribe to the “Oncology Peer Review On-The-Go” podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or anywhere podcasts are available.

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