ASCO Launches Online Educational Initiative: ‘Grand Rounds’

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OncologyONCOLOGY Vol 14 No 7
Volume 14
Issue 7

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recently launched a new online education resource-ASCO Grand Rounds- for cancer professionals, featuring biweekly CME-accredited lectures on current topics in cancer. The lectures will

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recently launched a new online education resource—ASCO Grand Rounds— for cancer professionals, featuring biweekly CME-accredited lectures on current topics in cancer. The lectures will be conducted by leading oncologists and cancer-care professionals and will include a physician-moderated online question-and-answer session for ASCO members. This new resource is available from ASCO OnLine, at www.asco.org.

Staying Current

ASCO Grand Rounds offers physicians an easy way to stay abreast of developments in cancer research. Each lecture consists of a 20- to 45-minute discussion that participants can listen to while viewing a synchronized slide presentation. Lectures will cover topics such as new drug development, cancer genetics, and supportive care and will be available throughout the year on ASCO’s website. Approximately two new lectures will be presented each month.

“We are excited that ASCO is taking a leading role in providing online education to oncologists around the world,” said ASCO president Joseph S. Bailes, MD.

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