Sulindac Appears an Effective Treatment of Sporadic Polyps

July 1, 1997

WASHINGTON--Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is known to prevent the growth of adenomas and cause their regression in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, but data are limited for its effects in the more common sporadic adenomas.

WASHINGTON--Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID),is known to prevent the growth of adenomas and cause their regression inpatients with familial adenomatous polyposis, but data are limited forits effects in the more common sporadic adenomas.

Now, a study presented at Digestive Disease Week has shown that sulindacmay be an effective therapy for common polyps. "These findings havegreat potential for polyp treatment and cancer prevention," said JamesA. DiSario, MD, assistant professor of medicine, the University of UtahHealth Sciences Center.

The study included persons without familial syndromes who had polypsidentified at colonoscopy. A small polyp was marked and left in place.Then, in a randomized double-blinded fashion, patients were assigned toreceive either sulindac or a placebo. Colonoscopy was repeated after ayear of treatment, and any polyps that remained in place were measuredand biopsied.

In the sulindac group, 78% of patients had regression or stabilizationof their polyps. Compared with polyps in the control group, polyps in thesulindac-treated patients shrank by 29%, and no polyp in the treatmentgroup enlarged.