5 Questions on Genitourinary Cancers

January 1, 2017
Debra Hughes
Debra Hughes

Do you know the most important risk factor in urothelial cancers? How about testicular cancer patients’ risk of developing cancer in the opposite testicle? Test your knowledge on these topics and more in our latest quiz.

 

Question 1:

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The correct answer is: B. 2,030

In most developed nations, penile cancer is rare. In the United States, the rate is less than 1 per 100,000 men annually.

 

Question 2:

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The correct answer is: D. 909

The National Cancer Institute’s PDQ cancer information summary about penile cancer treatment states that “according to published data, if the relationship is causal, the number needed to treat was about 909 circumcisions to prevent a single case of invasive penile cancer.”

 

Question 3:

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The correct answer is: D. Tobacco smoking

Tobacco exposure increases risk for upper tract urothelial cancers between threefold and sevenfold, according to a recent study. Whether electronic cigarettes are less carcinogenic remains a controversial topic. Aristolochic acid, a compound found in medicinal herbs, has been linked to a fivefold increase in incidence of urothelial carcinoma. Many organic chemicals have been banned in industrial use, eliminating their contribution to these cancers.

 

Question 4:

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The correct answer is: D. 90%

Considered one of the “top 5 advances in modern oncology” by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, new treatment introduced in 1977 has led to 98% of men now being cured today. The chemotherapy regimen of cisplatin, vinblastine, and bleomycin initially “brought unprecedented 5-year survival rates of 64%.”

 

Question 5:

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The correct answer is: A. 2%

The National Cancer Institute’s PDQ cancer information summary about testicular cancer treatment states, “Within this range, men with nonseminomatous primary tumors appear to have a lower risk of subsequent contralateral testis tumors than men with seminomas.”