Better Diet Among Black Men Could Help Reduce Health Disparities

Publication
Article
Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 11 No 10
Volume 11
Issue 10

WASHINGTON-A National Cancer Institute (NCI) summary of the link between diet and health among African-American men shows the impact of their eating habits and how increased consumption of fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of many diseases, including some cancers.

WASHINGTON—A National Cancer Institute (NCI) summary of the link between diet and health among African-American men shows the impact of their eating habits and how increased consumption of fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of many diseases, including some cancers.

The document emphasizes that many diseases disproportionately affect black men and that diet contributes to the problem. "We want to let black men know that eating five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day can play a tremendous role in promoting health and reducing their risk of disease," said Lorelei DiSogra, EdD, RD, director of NCI’s "Five a Day to Better Health" program.

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