Church Programs Motivate Black Men to Get Prostate Cancer Screening

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Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 11 No 5
Volume 11
Issue 5

WASHINGTON-Twice as many black as white men prefer not to know that they have prostate cancer, and two thirds believe that it is a "death sentence" with a treatment "worse than the disease," according to a study reported by Allyson Schifano, MPH, CHES, at the 8th Biennial Symposium on Minorities, the Medically Underserved, and Cancer.

WASHINGTON—Twice as many black as white men prefer not to know that they have prostate cancer, and two thirds believe that it is a "death sentence" with a treatment "worse than the disease," according to a study reported by Allyson Schifano, MPH, CHES, at the 8th Biennial Symposium on Minorities, the Medically Underserved, and Cancer.

Despite these negative attitudes, community-based and culturally appropriate screening campaigns, especially when associated with men’s churches, markedly increase prostate cancer screening among black men, said Ms. Schifano, of the Scripps Cancer Center, La Jolla, California. In her study, 56% of those who underwent screening cited encouragement from their church as a major motivation; 52% cited concern for their health. Holding the screening immediately after a men’s prayer meeting was the most effective tactic, Ms. Schifano stated.  

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