EphA2-targeted therapy strikes directly at cells of ovarian cancer

September 21, 2009
Oncology NEWS Today Blog, Oncology NEWS Today Blog Vol 18 No 9, Volume 18, Issue 9

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center scientists have targeted a protein that is overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells and used it as a molecular homing mechanism to deliver chemotherapy in preclinical models. The protein, EphA2, is attractive for molecularly targeted therapy because its overexpression is associated with poor prognosis, according to Anil K. Sood, MD, and colleagues.

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center scientists have targeted a protein that is overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells and used it as a molecular homing mechanism to deliver chemotherapy in preclinical models. The protein, EphA2, is attractive for molecularly targeted therapy because its overexpression is associated with poor prognosis, according to Anil K. Sood, MD, and colleagues.

The Houston-based researchers used a carrier system to deliver an anti-EphA2 monoclonal antibody linked to monomethyl auristatin phenylalanine (MMAF). The immunoconjugate was highly specific in delivering MMAF to the tumor cells that expressed EphA2 while showing minimal uptake in cells that did not express the protein. In the models, the therapy inhibited tumor growth in treated mice by 85%-98% compared with control mice (J Natl Cancer Inst online, July 29, 2009).

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