NCI Says Long-Awaited Long Island Breast Cancer Study Now Underway

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Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 5 No 8
Volume 5
Issue 8

BETHESDA, Md--The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project, ordered by Congress in 1993, is now underway under the auspices of the NCI and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The study will attempt to determine whether pollutants (pesticides and other chemical irritants) are linked to the area's excessive breast cancer rates.

BETHESDA, Md--The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project, orderedby Congress in 1993, is now underway under the auspices of theNCI and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.The study will attempt to determine whether pollutants (pesticidesand other chemical irritants) are linked to the area's excessivebreast cancer rates.

During, the 4-year study, being conducted by researchers fromColumbia University School of Public Health, 33 Long Island hospitalswill provide the names of newly diagnosed breast cancer patientswhom the researchers will invite to join the study. Blood andurine samples will be taken prior to treatment, along with a familyand medical history. The researchers will collect dust, water,and soil samples from the homes of 325 participants. Planned enrollmentis 1,600 patients plus 1,600 controls, with results expected by1999.

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