September Is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month

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OncologyONCOLOGY Vol 13 No 9
Volume 13
Issue 9

The Gynecologic Cancer Foundation, along with the American Hospital Association, has declared September 1999 the first annual Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month. Each year, 82,000 women in the United States (ie, 1 in every 25 women) are

The Gynecologic Cancer Foundation, along with the American Hospital Association, has declared September 1999 the first annual Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month. Each year, 82,000 women in the United States (ie, 1 in every 25 women) are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer.

Women need to be aware of the tools available to safeguard their own health and their own lives. When women are aware of the dangers of gynecologic cancers, they can assess personal risk factors, learn to make necessary lifestyle changes, and lay the groundwork for a lifelong gynecologic health care routine.

Women need to learn about the resources available to help them find support, seek advice, and learn about the latest research on gynecologic cancers.

Call to Action

During September, physicians should encourage their patients to proactively seek resources to educate themselves about and protect themselves from the fourth leading cause of death among women. Two resources provided by the Gynecologic Cancer Foundation are:

Women’s Cancer Network at www.wcn.org—At this web site, women can obtain a free, confidential cancer risk assessment, as well as the latest breaking news on women’s cancer issues.

Gynecologic Cancer Information Hotline(1-800-444-4441)—By dialing this toll-free number, women can obtain free gynecologic cancer information and assistance, including a booklet entitled “Maintain Your Gynecologic Health With Education and Early Detection.”

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