Author | Sofia D. Merajver, MD, PhD

Articles

Molecular Determinants of the Inflammatory Breast Cancer Phenotype

December 01, 2008

Since its early descriptions by Lee and Tannenbaum in 1924, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) has been recognized as the most aggressive and lethal form of primary breast cancer. With distinct clinical, pathologic, biologic, and molecular features, IBC presents unique challenges and opportunities to breast oncologists and breast cancer researchers.

Further Perspectives on Inflammatory Breast Cancer

May 01, 2007

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of the disease. It is diagnosed based on clinical signs of a rapidly enlarging, tender, erythematous, edematous breast that often presents without an underlying breast mass. IBC historically was considered a uniformly fatal disease. With the advent of multimodality treatments including primary systemic chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy, approximately one-third of women diagnosed with IBC will become long-term survivors. This review examines the limitations of the current definition of IBC, explores our current understanding of the biology of IBC, and reviews the many exciting advances in locoregional and systemic treatment of IBC.

Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Women With Strong Family Histories

July 01, 2001

Assessing the risk of breast and ovarian cancer starts with obtaining a complete and accurate family history. This can reveal evidence of inherited cancer risk. The highest risk of cancer is associated with germ-line abnormalities