ONCOLOGY Vol 14 No 2 | Oncology

Damage Control on Pain Control

February 01, 2000

Sen. Don Nickles (R-OK) says maybe he will, and maybe he won’t,make the changes to his Pain Relief Promotion Act (S. 1272) that the American Medical Association (AMA) is requesting. S. 1272 is the Senate version of a bill (HR 2260) that

IOM Committee Endorses Medicare Reimbursement for Clinical Trials

February 01, 2000

here has been some private sector momentum on the issue of insurance company reimbursement of patient care costs in cancer clinical trials. Now the spotlight may shift to Medicare reimbursement, especially since the Institute of Medicine

FDA Approves Docetaxel for Advanced NSCLC

February 01, 2000

Docetaxel (Taxotere) was recently approved by the Food and and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after failure of prior platinum-based chemotherapy.

C. Everett Koop Initiates Online Clinical Trials Info Center for Patients

February 01, 2000

Former US surgeon general C. Everett Koop, MD, and Quintiles Transnational Corp. have launched an interactive, consumer Internet resource to enable interested individuals to sign up online for possible participation in clinical drug trials via the

Major Advance in Treating Relapsed Childhood Leukemia

February 01, 2000

In a significant advance in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers from the Pediatric Oncology Group have found that the use of drugs known to cross into the central nervous system results in high survival rates

Licorice Root Extract Shows Antitumor Activity

February 01, 2000

A substance extracted from licorice root, Licochalcone-A, has been shown to have antitumor activity in acute leukemia, breast, and prostate cancer cell lines by lowering the amount of bcl-2, a drug-resistant protein. Excess amounts of this

Celecoxib Approved as Adjunct for Patients With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

February 01, 2000

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved celecoxib (Celebrex) as an oral adjunct to the standard care (eg, endoscopic surveillance and surgery) of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Celecoxib, the only

New Anticancer Agent With Minimal Side Effects Has Unique Mechanism of Action

February 01, 2000

An ongoing phase I clinical trial shows that a new anticancer agent, CCI-779, is well-tolerated and may have antitumor activity. CCI-779 is a derivative of rapamycin, an immunosuppressive agent. Results of the study were presented at the

New Breast Cancer Treatment Available for Women Who Do Not Respond to Tamoxifen

February 01, 2000

The first oral aromatase inactivator for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer whose tumors have stopped responding to tamoxifen (Nolvadex) therapy is now available in the United States. Pharmacia & Upjohn

Immediate Hormonal Therapy vs Observation in Node-Positive Prostate Cancer

February 01, 2000

Immediate antiandrogen therapy after radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy improves survival and reduces the risk of recurrence in patients with node-positive prostate cancer, according to a study published in the December 9, 1999,

UICC International Union Against Cancer Familial Cancer and Prevention

February 01, 2000

At the beginning of the 1997 International Union AgainstCancer (UICC) conference in Kobe, Japan, the speakers invoked Buddhist imagery to inspire the audience to embrace cancer genetics in the “battle” against “the enemy.” Asura, a figure with

Potential Role of Tumor Vaccines in GI Malignancies

February 01, 2000

The article by Laheru and Jaffee offers an excellent summary of immunotherapies for gastrointestinal malignancies. Thoughtful descriptions of the antibody, cytokine, and cel- lular components of the immune system provide useful background information that facilitates an understanding of specific passive and active cancer immunotherapies. Immunotherapies that have demonstrated efficacy in colon cancer clinical trials, including levamisole (Ergamisol), passive monoclonal antibody vaccines, and bacillus Calmette- Guérin (BCG)–autologous tumor vaccines, are appropriately reviewed. In addition, novel approaches at varying stages of clinical testing are clearly summarized; these include the use of an anti-idiotypic antibody, genetically modified tumor and dendritic cells, recombinant protein, and viral and DNA vaccines. Some additional approaches, studies, and perspectives are also worthy of mention as a supplement to this review.

Update on the Management of Primary CNS Lymphoma

February 01, 2000

Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma restricted to the nervous system. The incidence of this lymphoma is rising in the immunocompetent population but may be decreasing in

High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Stem Cell Rescue in the Outpatient Setting

February 01, 2000

The number of autologous periperal blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplants performed annually has increased dramatically over the past decade. Autologous PBPC transplants have quickly moved from the exclusive province of the academic medical center to part of the armamentarium of the practicing community oncologist

High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Stem Cell Rescue in the Outpatient Setting

January 02, 2000

Outpatient bone marrow transplant (BMT) strategies, as reviewed by Dix and Geller, have evolved for various reasons—from social to medical. If high-dose approaches are to become a viable treatment for common cancers, such as breast cancer, the refinement of transplants to a “kinder and gentler” approach is essential.

Cancer and Male Sexual Dysfunction

February 01, 2000

Dr. Costabile presents a thorough review of the biological causes of erectile dysfunction after cancer treatment and of our current range of medical treatments to restore erections. I believe, however, that despite the technical progress made in understanding and remediating erectile dysfunction during the last 20 years, the majority of men who develop such problems following cancer treatment still do not resume a satisfying sex life.

Update on the Management of Primary CNS Lymphoma

February 01, 2000

Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma restricted to the nervous system. The incidence of this lymphoma is rising in the immunocompetent population but may be decreasing in patients

Cancer and Male Sexual Dysfunction

February 01, 2000

Erectile dysfunction is a common occurrence as men age. Approximately 20% of men over the age of 50 years report difficulty in achieving or maintaining an erection, and as many as 60% of men age 70 and older suffer from erectile dysfunction.[1]

Update on the Management of Primary CNS Lymphoma

February 01, 2000

Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma restricted to the nervous system. The incidence of this lymphoma is rising in the immunocompetent population but may be decreasing in patients

Potential Role of Tumor Vaccines in GI Malignancies

February 01, 2000

Laheru and Jaffee review the potential role of tumor vaccines in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, which represent the leading cause of cancer death and are believed to be poorly immunogenic. The authors carefully review the questions and controversies surrounding currently available immunotherapeutic strategies and describe ongoing clinical protocols using tumor vaccine therapy, a few of which deserve special comment.

Cancer and Male Sexual Dysfunction

February 01, 2000

Many men with cancer develop erectile dysfunction during treatment of their malignancy. Erectile dysfunction in these patients often has multiple causes, both physiologic and psychological. Various treatment options, including

Update on the Management of Primary CNS Lymphoma

February 01, 2000

Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma restricted to the nervous system. The incidence of this lymphoma is rising in the immunocompetent population but may be decreasing in patients

Potential Role of Tumor Vaccines in GI Malignancies

February 01, 2000

Although surgery remains the only curative option for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy and/or localized radiation is considered standard therapy for patients who present with

High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Stem Cell Rescue in the Outpatient Setting

February 01, 2000

Intensive outpatient care is rapidly becoming the primary mode of care for selected patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. Although the traditional inpatient model of care may still be necessary for high-risk patients, published data suggest that outpatient care is safe and feasible during or after administration of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous PBSC transplant. Blood and marrow transplant (BMT) centers have developed programs to provide more outpatient care under three basic models: an early discharge model, a delayed admission model, and a comprehensive, or total, outpatient model. This review will describe these models of care and address the elements necessary for the development of an outpatient BMT program, including patient selection, staff development, and patient and caregiver education. Available supportive care strategies to facilitate outpatient care will also be highlighted.

Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Best Practice Policy

February 01, 2000

Prostate cancer is the most common form of noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Despite its prevalence, the natural history of this disease is remarkably heterogeneous. In many patients, the cancer