Prostate Cancer Awareness Stamp Debuts

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Oncology NEWS InternationalOncology NEWS International Vol 8 No 11
Volume 8
Issue 11

WASHINGTON-The US Postal Service has issued a 33 cent postage stamp designed to encourage the early detection and treatment of prostate cancer. The stamp features a drawing of the male gender symbol against a red background. The words “Prostate Cancer Awareness-Annual Checkups and Tests” appear on the stamp, which was designed by Michael Cronan of San Francisco.

WASHINGTON—The US Postal Service has issued a 33 cent postage stamp designed to encourage the early detection and treatment of prostate cancer. The stamp features a drawing of the male gender symbol against a red background. The words “Prostate Cancer Awareness—Annual Checkups and Tests” appear on the stamp, which was designed by Michael Cronan of San Francisco.

The stamp was dedicated in a ceremony in Austin, Texas, last summer, as part of the “Ride for the Roses” fundraising weekend hosted by the Lance Armstrong Foundation. Mr. Armstrong, captain of the US Postal Service Pro Cycling Team and winner of the 1999 Tour de France bicycle race, is a survivor of testicular cancer. The Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee recommended this subject as part of its continuing effort to generate awareness for social issues.

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