Andrea Wolf, MD, on Lung Cancer Rates in Women

December 2, 2020
Hannah Slater

The director of the new Women’s Lung Cancer Program at Mount Sinai spoke about the gaps in lung cancer research for women and what she hopes this new program will offer women moving forward.

According to recent studies, more women have died of lung cancer than the total number of women who have died from breast, ovarian and uterine cancer combined.

Moreover, women who have never smoked are suggested to be twice as likely to develop lung cancer than men who have never smoked, partially due to genetic and other factors. Women who smoke are also more likely to develop lung cancer than men, and when screened, women are almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with lung cancer.

Given these staggering statistics, Andrea Wolf, MD, and her colleagues at Mount Sinai launched the Women’s Lung Cancer Program in an attempt to address these issues in both research and screening. In an interview with CancerNetwork®, Wolf, director of the new Women’s Lung Cancer Program, discussed the gaps in lung cancer research for women and what she hopes this new program will offer women moving forward.

This segment comes from the CancerNetwork® portion of the MJH Life Sciences Medical World News, airing daily on all MJH Life Sciences channels.