A Quick News Quiz on GU Cancers

March 10, 2017

What class of agents negatively affects responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors? Which gender is significantly more likely to undergo radical cystectomy for bladder cancer? Test your knowledge on genitourinary cancers in our latest quiz.

What class of agents negatively affects responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors? Which gender is significantly more likely to undergo radical cystectomy for bladder cancer? Test your knowledge on genitourinary cancers in our latest quiz.

Question 1:

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The correct answer is: A. Bicalutamide. According to the study, patients received oral bicalutamide 150 mg day during and after radiation therapy. At 12 years, overall survival was 76.3% in the bicalutamide group vs 71.3% in the placebo group (P = .04). Incidence of death from prostate cancer was 13.4% vs 5.8% (P < .001), and cumulative incidence of metastatic prostate cancer was 23% vs 14.5% (P =.005), respectively.

 

Question 2:

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The correct answer is: A. Cabozantinib. Median overall survival was 21.4 months with cabozantinib vs 16.5 months with everolimus, according to the study. The authors concluded, “cabozantinib is an important new treatment option for this patient population.”

 

Question 3:

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The correct answer is: D. 240 mg intravenously every 2 weeks.

 

Question 4:

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The correct answer is: A. Antibiotics. The study found that patients had received mostly beta-lactamases and fluoroquinolones. Objective response rates were lower and there was a negative trend for overall survival.

Question 5:

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The correct answer is: B. False. Women in the study were older, more likely to be non-Caucasian, had increased comorbidities, and presented with more advanced disease (all P < .001). Women had significantly worse cancer-specific survival than men. Although “delay from diagnosis to radical cystectomy was associated with worse survival,” the authors noted, “delay to surgery did not account for this deceased survival among women.” They concluded, “these findings support further research discerning bladder carcinogenesis according to gender.”