Guido Lancman, MD, on the Impact of IVIg in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Receiving Daratumumab

January 8, 2021
Guido Lancman, MD

A study of the use of intravenous immunoglobulin on infections in patients with multiple myeloma receiving daratumumab suggested a role for the strategy in this patient population.

A study which evaluated the effect of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) on infections in patients with multiple myeloma receiving daratumumab (Darzalex) presented at the 2020 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition suggested that it may be especially useful in patients with recurrent infections.

In an interview with CancerNetwork®, Guido Lancman, MD, hematology and oncology fellow at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, explained the design of the study and what led he and his colleagues to perform the study.

Transcription:

The results show that IVIg does reduce infections in patients receiving daratumumab, but this is a retrospective study. There is a selection bias in the patients who got IVIg. What we’re going to do is we’re going to look a little bit deeper into the data to see which patients are most likely to benefit, because not necessarily all patients who get [daratumumab] will need IVIg. In this study, the patients who got IVIg, for the most part, had recurrent infections prior and [hypogammaglobulinemia].

Reference:

Lancman G, Sastow D, Aslanova M, et al. Effect of intravenous immunoglobulin on infections in multiple myeloma (MM) patients receiving daratumumab. Presented at: 2020 American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting & Exposition; December 5-8, 2020; Virtual. Paper ID #1404.